Are roads in America deadlier during the World Series?

FREE Car Insurance Comparison

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save!

Click here for rankings table and click here to view interactive graphics.

Here's what you need to know...

Ever since the Boston Red Sox won the first World Series in 1903, Americans have been captivated by baseball.

However, a lot has changed since then with 80,632,000 people and only 32,920 cars in the U.S. in 1903. Plus, MLB games didn’t get broadcasted on the radio until 1921 or on TV until 1939.

Back then, the biggest games in baseball didn’t pose the risks they do today.

In 1903 in the U.S., there were 117 deaths due to car crashes. In 2015 there were 35,092. That’s 300 times the number of Americans killed in traffic accidents.

Sadly U.S. roads can be downright deadly. And, the sport rich with American heritage is surrounded with devastating loss — and not just when the home team loses. Fatal crashes follow these events as closely as the beer, peanuts, Cracker Jack, and hot dogs.

Methodology

See more interactive graphics here

  • This article is a result of an in-depth study of seven years of NHTSA fatal crash reports.
  • Our team of analysts compiled nearly 25,000 data points of deadly accidents that occurred on the roads in the home and away states for the entire World Series.
  • To allow for the study of the complete trend for the seven years, this data includes the days just before and after each World Series, off days in between the games played, and a fatal crash annual average that includes the off season.
  • The top four facts below include the best and worst game days for fatal crashes in America for the winning and losing teams’ home states.
  • The remaining facts are correlated from the 25,000 data points we collected.

10 Sobering Facts About Fatal Car Crashes During the World Series

Our researchers at CarInsuranceComparison.com are the best in the business. No other team in the history of this industry has completed a study with as many data points that have the possibility of affecting real lives during the World Series.

Until now, we never knew how much fear, injury, and death could come from something as wonderful as America’s favorite past time.

#1 – The World Series Game with the MOST Fatal Crashes: Winning State

Game and Year: Game 3 (2010)
Winning Team of Series: San Francisco Giants
Fatal Crashes in Home State: 13
Difference from Daily Average: +89.5 percent

It was Saturday, October 30, 2010, and time for game three of the Giants vs the Rangers at Globe Life Park. The Giants were on a roll winning the first two games of the series by a total of 13 points. Game two the Giants didn’t even let the Rangers get a single run in!

However, game three played out much differently, and the state of California was in pain for different reasons.  The overly confident Giants who came onto the field at 6 p.m., lost with a final score of two to four. The Giants managed a series win in the end, but that night, California residents seemed to have lost hope or at least let their frustration take the wheel. 

The state of California had an annual fatal crash average of 6.86 in 2010, but on that Saturday there was a shocking 89.5 percent increase with 13 people killed in crashes. The Golden State’s traffic fatal crashes made up 15.66 percent all of the fatal crashes that occurred in the U.S. that entire day.

#2 – The World Series Game with the MOST Fatal Crashes: Losing State

Game and Year: Game 3 (2010)
Losing Team of Series: Texas Rangers
Fatal Crashes in Home State: 18
Difference from Daily Average: +139.26 percent

The Rangers may have won their first-and only-game of the series that day, but game 3 of the 2010 MLB World Series was a day of loss in the U.S. with a total of 31 people killed in car crashes in the home (Texas) and away (California) states alone.

Texas’ daily average for fatal crashes in 2010 was 7.52, but that day of victory for the Rangers meant a drastic increase in deaths by an almost unbelievable 139.26 percent!

The data from 2010 clearly points to the culprit for that day’s spike in deaths. 31 percent of all the 2010’s fatal crashes in Texas had drivers impaired by alcohol to blame . . . causing a total of 958 deaths in that one state during one year alone. It seems as though fans may have had one too many celebratory beers before getting behind the wheel that night.

#3 – The World Series Game with the LEAST Fatal Crashes: Winning State

Game and Year: (Tie) Game 1 (2011) and Games 2 and 4 (2013)
Winning Team of Series: St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Red Sox
Fatal Crashes in Home State: 0
Difference from Daily Average:  -100 percent

Only three times in the last seven years were there zero fatal crashes in the winning team’s home state during any World Series game day. And, what’s really interesting is that all three of those days had just one team in common, the St. Louis Cardinals!  

Here are the only three times it happened:

  • Game 1: Wednesday, October 19, 2011, Cardinals vs Rangers – The Cardinals won this game by one point and won the World Series by one game. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the winning team’s home state, Missouri.
  • Game 2: Thursday, October 24, 2013, Cardinals vs Red Sox – The Cardinals won this game by two points but lost the World Series by one game. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the winning team’s home state, Massachusetts.
  • Game 4: Sunday, October 27, 2013, Cardinals vs Red Sox – The Cardinals lost this game by two points and lost the World Series by one game. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the winning team’s home state, Massachusetts.

With all the tailgating, drinking during the game, celebrating the winning team, frustration over the losing team, and traffic going to and from the games, it’s impressive that there were zero fatal crashes on both of those days in the series hosting states: Missouri (October 19, 2011) and in Massachusetts (October 24, 2013).

When St. Louis hosted game four, there were no fatal crashes in all of Massachusetts, but Missouri didn’t have the same luck with seven that day. Regardless, it seems the winning World Series team is given a safe driving “good luck charm” when the Cardinals are involved.

#4 – The World Series Game with the LEAST Fatal Crashes: Losing State

Game and Year: (Tie) Game 4 (2012), Game 7 (2014), and Game 1 (2015)
Losing Team of Series: Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Royals, and New York Mets
Fatal Crashes in Home State: 0
Difference from Daily Average: -100%

An interesting fact we discovered: Out of every World Series game in the past seven years, the only three game days with zero fatal crashes in the losing team’s home state happened when their team lost the game. It seems as though disappointed fans drive safer.  

Here are the only three times it happened:

  • Game 4: Wednesday, October 24, 2012, Giants vs Tigers – The Tigers lost this game by five points and lost the World Series by four games. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the losing team’s home state, Michigan.
  • Game 7: Wednesday, October 29, 2014, Giants vs Royals – The Royals lost this game by one point and lost the World Series by one game. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the losing team’s home state, Missouri.
  • Game 1: Tuesday, October 27, 2015, Royals vs Mets – The Mets lost this game by one point and lost the World Series by three games. There were ZERO fatal crashes on this day in the losing team’s home state, New York.

All three teams beat the odds on the roads these days. Michigan had a 2.39 daily fatal crash average, Missouri’s average was 1.91, and New York’s, 2.91!

The Tigers, Royals, and Mets may have lost those three games and the World Series those years, but they won in our book with zero fatal crashes on those game days in their home state.

#5 – The Roads on World Series Game Days

Do more fatal crashes occur during the World Series? The data answers yes!

Over the past seven years on World Series game days, there has been an average of 9.2 percent more car crashes-each resulting in deaths-compared to the rest of the year.

Compared to the annual national average, here’s the breakdown since 2010:

  • Entire World Series – 5.4 percent increase (includes day before/after and days off)
  • Actual Game Days – 9.2 percent increase
  • Deadliest Game Days – Game Three: 29.7 percent increase and Game Four: 29.2 percent increase
  • Winning Team’s Home State – 10.7 percent increase
  • Losing Team’s Home State – 3 percent increase

# 6 – The MOST Deadly World Series Game Day

Our study of the past seven years of the World Series found the day with the most fatal crashes was game four.

Since it’s the first team to win four games, the World Series always has a fourth game. On average from 2010 to 2016, game four had a 29.7 percent increase in fatal crashes compared to any other game day.

In the past seven years during game fours, there has been an average of 111 fatal vehicle collisions in the U.S. Keep in mind one fatal crash may have several victims.

The last seven World Series game fours:

  • Sunday, October 31, 2010, Giants vs Rangers – The Giants won this game by four points and won the World Series by three games. There were a total of 19 fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (California and Texas).
  • Sunday, October 23, 2011, Cardinals vs Rangers – The Rangers won this game by four points, but lost the World Series by one game. There were a total of seven fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (Missouri and Texas).
  • Sunday, October 28, 2012, Giants vs Tigers – The Giants won this game by one point and won the World Series by four games. There were a total of 10 fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (California and Michigan).
  • Sunday, October 27, 2013, Red Sox vs Cardinals – The Red Sox won this game by two points and won the World Series by two games. There were a total of seven fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (Massachusetts and Missouri).
  • Saturday, October 25, 2014, Giants vs Royals – The Giants won this game by seven points and won the World Series by one game. There were a total of 15 fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (California and Missouri).
  • Saturday, October 31, 2015, Royals vs Mets – The Royals won this game by two points but lost the World Series by three games. There were a total of nine fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (Missouri and New York).
  • Saturday, October 29, 2016, Indians vs Cubs – The Indians won this game by five points but lost the World Series by one game. There were a total of 14 fatal crashes on this day in the two teams’ home states (Ohio and Illinois).

All 81 of those game four deadly car crashes occurred on a Saturday or Sunday, which are statistically proven to have higher fatal crash rates in the U.S. anytime of the year.

The most deadly game four of the past seven World Series was in 2014 when the U.S. had an astronomical spike of fatal car crashes — a 72.83 percent increase from the annual average!

The average number of daily fatal crashes in the U.S. for 2014 was 82.2, whereas on the Saturday that the Giants spanked the Royals 142 fatal crashes occurred.

#7 – The LEAST Deadly World Series Game Day

Game six is hands down the least deadly game day with 10.2 percent less fatal crashes than any other World Series game day.

It doesn’t just beat out the other game days either. On average, 77 fatal car accidents happened on game day six in the U.S. over the past seven years, which is lower than the national annual average of 85.2.

This game day with the safest roads happened four times since 2010:

  • Thursday, October 27, 2011
  • Wednesday, October 30, 2013
  • Tuesday, October 28, 2014
  • Tuesday, November 1, 2015

It’s no coincidence that all of these least deadly game sixes happened on a weekday. This consideration further bolsters the claim that weekends are deadlier days to drive in the U.S. whether the World Series is going on or not.

The least deadly game six in the past seven World Series was in 2013 when the Red Sox won their World Champions title back. That win was a monumental day for the Red Sox because it was the first World Series win at Boston’s beloved Fenway Park since 95 years prior when Babe Ruth was still playing for them.

Game six in 2013 wasn’t just a victory for Boston. There was a 23.87 percent decrease in fatal car crashes that day in the U.S. with nearly 20 less fatal car crashes than the annual average for that year.

#8 – Fatal Crash Rates on World Series Game Days

In our seven year World Series study, we calculated the fatal crash rates for all game days in both the winning and losing teams’ home states. These percent differences are in comparison to the involved states’ annual fatal crash average.

Winning State:

  • Game 1  down 13.3 percent 
  • Game 2 – down 3.3 percent
  • Game 3 – up 66.8 percent 
  • Game 4  up 46.8 percent
  • Game 5 – up 33.3 percent
  • Game 6 – down 10.8 percent
  • Game 7 – down 12.2 percent

Losing State:

  • Game 1 – down 33.6 percent
  • Game 2 – down 11.5 percent
  • Game 3 – up 65.9 percent 
  • Game 4 – up 36.4 percent 
  • Game 5 – up 13.2 percent
  • Game 6 – down 16.1 percent
  • Game 7 – up 36.8 percent

It’s interesting that games one, two, and six all consistently had a decrease in fatal crashes while games three, four, and five all had increases in fatal crashes in BOTH the winning and losing teams’ home states.

Also, the losing team’s hometown drivers seem more affected with over half of the game days’ increases and decreases all being greater in the losing team’s state.

Win or lose, World Series Game Day Three is undeniably treacherous with a 65.9 to 66.8 percent increase in fatal crashes on that one day.

Apparently, World Series losses cause pain to a lot more than just the players and their fans.

#9 – Fatal Crash Trends During the World Series

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjzslG3YJug

Here are some quick, condensed facts about fatal crashes during the World Series the past seven years:

  • Game Four is the deadliest World Series game day with 774 total fatal crashes, a 29.7 percent increase over the U.S. annual average.
  • Game Four has only been played on a Saturday or Sunday for the past seven World Series, which helps to explain why it is the deadliest game day to drive.
  • Game Six is the least deadly World Series game day with 306 total fatal crashes, a 10.2 percent decrease over the U.S. annual average.
  • Game Six has only been played on a weekday for the past seven World Series, which helps to explain why it is the least deadly game day to drive.
  • Game Seven doesn’t always happen, but when the series reaches this final game, the winning team’s home state sees a 12.2 percent decrease in fatal crashes, while the losing team sees a drastic increase of 36.8 percent.
  • Five of the Only Six games that had zero fatal crashes in the winning or losing team’s home state all occurred on a weekday.
  • Home Games result in more fatal crashes during the World Series than away games. A home game meant 2.8 percent more fatal crashes for the winning team and 9 percent more fatal crashes for the losing team than an away game.
  • Home States’ win or lose outcome plays a major role in fatal crash rates. The winning team’s home state experienced a 10.7 percent increase in fatal crashes, while the losing team’s home state only had a 3 percent increase.

Blend any of the following during the World Series: home game, game day three, game day four, and a Saturday or Sunday, and you have yourself the perfect recipe for a fatal car crash. Also, beware of driving on game day seven in the losing team’s home state.

#10 – Safety During the World Series

Like many car crashes during the World Series, the crash in the video (above) was caused by a mixture of celebration, excitement, adrenaline, and foolishness (alcohol likely played a part as well). Luckily that crash didn’t involve any other moving vehicles or cost someone’s life.

A devastating reality: Every single stat, every crash number we shared with you today DID cost lives. At least one person died in every one of the fatal car crashes that made up this seven-year study.

Another scary fact is that fatal crash rates in the U.S. are on the rise as drunk, distracted, and careless driving become our nation’s norm. The spike in deadly car crashes during the World Series is only going to get worse unless there are huge changes made across the U.S. surrounding these thrilling sporting events.

Complete Rankings: Fatal Crashes During the World Series

– Click here for the full stats and sources for each category. For all media inquiries, please email: Josh Barnes

PLAYOFF GAMENUMBER OF YEARSU.S. FATAL CRASH AVGGAME: AVG FATAL CRASHESPERCENT DIFFERENCEWINNING STATE: AVG FATAL CRASHESWINNING STATE % DIFFERENCELOSING STATE: AVG FATAL CRASHESLOSING STATE % DIFFERENCE
After WS785.20916.604.300.103.60-7.80
Before WS785.2074-13.303.90-9.903.60-7.80
Entire Series785.20905.504.5010.704.003.00
Game 1785.2077-9.603.70-13.302.60-33.60
Game 2785.2083-3.104.10-3.303.40-11.50
Game 3785.2011029.207.1066.806.4065.90
Game 4785.2011129.706.3046.805.3036.40
Game 5685.209612.105.0033.304.7013.20
Game 6485.2077-10.203.00-10.803.00-16.10
Game 7385.20927.603.70-12.205.7036.80
Gap 1 in WS785.20916.304.403.402.60-33.60
Gap 2 in WS485.2084-1.402.50-25.704.5025.90
Postponed185.2081-5.003.0052.904.00-47.70

FREE Car Insurance Comparison

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save!

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

[0-9]
[0-9]