Car Insurance and Moving to Another State (Tips and Comparison)

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Joel Ohman
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UPDATED: Mar 28, 2020

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Are you moving due to a job? Or did you recently get married? No matter the reason, you have a lot on your plate when you are moving from one place to another. Moving to a new state can be an even harder job.

We may not be able to helo you move boxes or unpack, but we can help you with figuring out your car insurance.

Wanting to check out rates in your new city now? Enter your ZIP code to use our free online car insurance quoting tool.

Table of Contents

Car Insurance Needs When Moving

Who to inform of change of address checklist

Moving, whether in the same state or across the county, can be a hectic time for anyone. Chances are you are looking at several different things.

What are the best neighborhoods? Where should my kids go to school? Who should we hire for movers?

The list can go on and on. One thing you may not have thought of is your insurance.

Do you need to inform my current insurance company of your address change?

YES! Informing your current car insurance company is very important. It could be the difference between having coverage or being left with a hefty bill not covered by your insurance carrier.

Your car insurance carrier must know where the car is being garaged or kept. Even if you are moving within the same state, your carrier needs to be informed. If you are moving out of state, that is even more important.

Not all insurance carriers write in all states. So, you may need to move to another carrier. State laws mandating insurance requirements can also differ from state to state.

Does changing your address affect your car insurance?

One of the factors in rating your insurance is where your car is being kept and the local area you are driving. Car insurance companies look at several different things in regard to your ZIP code.

Do you live in a rural or urban area? Living in a busy, high-traffic area can raise your insurance. Urban areas often tend to have higher crime rates as well.

Insurance companies look at the risk, which is you and your vehicle, and the likelihood of a claim being filed. If you live in a highly-populated area that affects your chances of filing a claim. Companies also look at where you park your vehicle. Parking in a garage will bring lower rates than parking on a street.

Every company will weigh these factors differently. Once you make the change to your policy, if moving within the same state, you can see the difference your new address makes on your policy.

How do you change car insurance when you move to another state?

If you are moving to a new state, the process of changing your address is a little more in-depth.

First, you will want to make sure your current company is available in your new state. Not all companies write in all 50 states, especially smaller companies.

You can call your insurance provider and tell them where you are moving. If your company writes directly, they can rewrite your policy. Writing directly simply means you do not have a local agent.

If you prefer a local agent, you can still call your insurance provider and they can give you a list of several local agents available in your area. You can then contact the agent, and they can assist you in re-writing your policy.

Can you keep the same insurance company even when you move?

If you move within your current state, the answer is yes. You can keep the same company, and you can update your address. If you had a local agent and want to get a new agent closer to your new home, you can contact your insurance provider, and they can give you a list of available local agents in your area.

Once you have found an agent, you can sign an agent of record letter and keep the same policy but change local agents.

Remember, some companies write directly; you do not necessarily have to have a local agent. Some people prefer to have an agent they can call directly or see in person.

Can you get out-of-state car insurance?

Insurance companies require your car registration and insurance to be in the same state. Likewise, the state department of motor vehicles also requires your car registration to match your home address.

Your primary address should be the address used for registration and on your insurance policy. We will cover below some instances when your location and registration may be different.

Can you have car insurance in two states?

Just like cars can not be registered in two different states, they can not be insured in two different states either. Your car can only be insured in the same state; it is registered, and since it can only be registered in one state, you can not have car insurance in two states for the same car. This may be disappointing to some, as extra protection is important, especially during cursed days like Friday the 13th.

What do you do with your old plates and tags?

If you move to a different state, you will need to register your car in that state, and you will also receive new tags for your car.

So, what do you do with your old plates?

We are going to go through the steps to take to turn in your old tags and start the process of getting your new tags. But, before you do anything with your tags, you must secure insurance in your new state.

Register Your Car and Get New Plates

Once you have obtained new insurance in your new state, you can register your vehicle and get new plates. Not all states are the same, but let’s take a look at Florida law as an example.

Once you have established residency in the state of Florida, you only have 10 days to secure insurance valid in Florida. Since the department of motor vehicles requires proof of insurance to register your vehicle, you must do this step first.

Florida law gives new residents 30 days to register and title your vehicle in Florida.

If you have a lienholder on your vehicle, you will need to send a letter to ask for a title transfer to your new home state. Once the lienholder agrees to transfer, you can fill out the proper application for the transfer of title.

You can then go to the state department of motor vehicles with the following documentation:

  • Proof of identity
  • Proof of Florida insurance
  • Original out-of-state title
  • Application for Certificate of Title With/Without Registration (HSMV form 82040).
  • Verification of physical inspection of the motor vehicle’s vehicle identification number (VIN), completed on an Application for Certificate of Title With/Without Registration (HSMV form 82040) or Vehicle Identification Number and Odometer Verification (HSMV form 82042).

Once you have received your new plates, you can then move on to the next step.

Cancel and Turn In Old Plates

Once you have received your new plates, you must follow proper protocol to turn in your old plates. Check with your former state department of motor vehicles to verify the proper procedures. In most states, you can turn in your old plates by mail.

Refund

Depending on your state law, you could be entitled to a refund for surrendered tags. For instance, New York offers residents a 50 percent refund if tags are surrendered within the first year of a two-year registration period.

How State Laws Affect Your Car Insurance

State laws not only affect your registration and title process, but state laws also dictate how much insurance you need to have your vehicle.

Let’s look at how state laws affect different areas of your car insurance.

Can you keep your car registered in a different state?

If you have primary residence in a state, your car needs to be registered in that same state. There can be extenuating circumstances, like college students and snowbirds, that will be covering a little later.

There is a lot that goes into moving to a new state, and changing your registration is probably not on the top of the list of things to do. State laws allow a grace period of drivers to get settled and make the registration change without feeling rushed.

How long do you have to transfer car insurance after you move to another state?

You must transfer your car insurance before you change your registration. You should change your insurance as soon as possible to make the process of transferring insurance and registration an easier process.

State laws vary from state to state. Some states, like Alaska, offer a 10-day grace period after accepting employment in the state. While other states, like Colorado and Kansas, offer a 90-day grace period.

Does your car insurance have to be in the state you live in?

Yes, insurance must be in the same state as where you live. Each state has its own laws mandating car insurance requirements. Insurance companies use various factors in determining your insurance premium. The location of your car is a big factor in your rate; therefore, you need insurance in the same state as where you live.

Do different states have different mandatory minimums?

Each state has its own law regarding mandatory minimum limits. Sometimes other state laws, like no-fault and at-fault laws, can determine what type of insurance you need as well.

For instance, no-fault states like Pennsylvania require additional coverages added to your policy. In no-fault states, when you are involved in an accident, each person’s insurance pays out no matter the fault. So most no-fault states require a medical coverage called personal injury protection or PIP.

When you are looking for car insurance in your new state, your provider will be aware of the state law requirements.

Check out our car insurance comprehensive guides. Click on your state below to find all the need to know facts about your new state.

Alabama

Liability for bodily injury and property means that you’re liable to pay the cost of harm/damages to people and property caused by you. In the event of an accident, your insurer would pay $25,000 per person towards medical expenses and a maximum of $50,000 overall. For damage to property, the insurer would pay a maximum of $25,000.

If you’re new to Alabama, you must remember a few important points about the auto insurance laws in the state.

  • Alabama uses the tort system which puts someone at fault if an accident occurs, so your insurance company would be liable to pay all damages if you’re held responsible for an accident.
  • The minimum auto insurance requirement for drivers in Alabama is $25,000 for bodily injury per person/$50,000 for bodily injury per incident, and $25,000 for property damage liability.
  • Since auto insurance is an expensive purchase, you must gather as much information as possible before buying coverage. If you’re unaware of the laws in Alabama, be a smart consumer and refer to this consumer guide.

Alaska

Alaska Minimum Car Insurance Coverage Requirements
Insurance RequiredCoverage
Bodily Injury Liability Coverage$50,000 per person
$100,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability Coverage$25,000 minimum

Let’s take a closer look at Alaska’s minimum liability car insurance requirements:

  • $50,000 per person for any individual’s injury or death resulting from an accident you caused while operating your vehicle
  • $100,000 per accident for total bodily injury or death liability resulting from an accident you caused while operating your vehicle
  • $25,000 for property damage expenses incurred per any accident you cause while operating your vehicle

If you’re gearing up for a move to The Last Frontier, here’s what you need to know about new resident licensure procedures. You will need to visit your local Division of Motor Vehicles location to apply for your new license and submit Form 478. You may print and fill out this form ahead of your visit.

Arizona

Type of CoverageCoverage Amount
Bodily Injury LiabilityMinimum $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident
Property Damage LiabilityMinimum $10,000
Uninsured Motorist Bodily InjuryMinimum $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Property DamageMinimum $10,000

The type of liability insurance required in Arizona involves both bodily injury and property damage. The minimum amount you are required to carry in Arizona if you are at-fault in an accident is as follows:

  • $15,000 to cover injury or death per person.
  • $30,000 to cover total injuries or death per person.
  • $10,000 to cover property damage per accident.

Arkansas

Type of CoverageMinimum Coverage
Bodily Injury$25,000 per person /$50,000 per accident
Property Damage$25,000 per accident

To drive a motor vehicle in Arkansas, your car insurance must include bodily injury and property damage coverage.

  • Bodily Injury – If you’re involved in an accident, the bodily injury coverage would cover the cost of medical expenses to the third-party who was injured in the accident. The minimum coverage law in Arkansas requires you to buy insurance that would pay medical expenses up to $25,000 for each injured person with a maximum limit of $50,000 per accident.
  • Property Damage – When you’re involved in an accident, you also end up damaging the third-party’s car for which Arkansas’ minimum coverage law requires you to buy insurance that can pay $25,000 to cover the loss.

Liability coverage also pays for the legal defense cost if the third-party decides to file a lawsuit against you.

Though there are minimum coverage laws in your state, it’s recommended that you buy additional coverage to pay-off the damages in case you’re involved in a major accident.

California

California is a fault state (also commonly known as “tort”), meaning the person who is found to be responsible for causing the auto accident is also legally and financially responsible for any subsequent damages.

All drivers in California are required to carry minimum liability insurance levels of 15/30/5 to satisfy basic coverage. This means that car owners must carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

  • $15,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $30,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $5,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle

Drivers in California have the option to purchase Medical Payments Coverage (Med Pay) of at least $1,000 to cover medical expenses after a crash regardless of who causes the car crash.

Colorado

The basic coverage requirements in Colorado which all motorists must have for liability insurance are:

  • $25,000 to cover the death or injury of one person
  • $50,000 to cover the death or injury of more than one person
  • $15,000 to cover property damage

Here are the guidelines for getting a new Colorado driver’s license.

The Colorado DMV website says you need a Colorado license within 30 days of residency. The residency requirements are as follows:

  • Own or operate a business in Colorado OR
  • Are gainfully employed in Colorado OR
  • Reside in Colorado for 90 consecutive days

Your valid driver’s license from your previous state of residence should be enough for you not to have to take a driving or written exam. When you go to the DMV to get a Colorado license, be prepared with the following documentation:

  • A valid driver license from the previous state of residence
  • Proof of your social security number
  • Two proofs of current Colorado address
  • Proof of lawful presence
  • Money for fees

Also, proof of adequate vision is required for driver licenses and permits.

After becoming a Colorado resident, you must register your vehicle within 90 days.

Connecticut

The required minimum limits for basic coverage in Connecticut is to 25/50/25 for all motorists. This means that car owners must carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

$25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, and $25,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle.

Connecticut does require you to carry Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage so that you can protect yourself and your passengers and pay for any medical bills if the at-fault driver has no insurance, or if you’re the victim of a hit-and-run.

Delaware

The Diamond State mandates that all drivers carry Personal Injury Protection (PIP). The minimum amount of PIP coverage required by law is $15,000 per person, $30,000 per occurrence. In addition, $5,000 funeral services coverage is required.

The required minimum limits for basic coverage in Delaware is to 25/50/10 for all motorists. This means that car owners must carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

$25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, and $10,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle.

Delaware does not require you to carry Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage, but it is a viable option and can protect you and your passengers if the at-fault driver has no insurance, or if you’re the victim of a hit-and-run.

If this is your first time being a resident in the First State, you may have some questions regarding how and when to apply for a new license in Delaware. The DMV and Department of Transportation in Delaware have provided you a lifeline in the form of this useful resource: Guidelines for New Residents.

Bring all required documentation to a driver’s licensing location to obtain your new Delaware driver’s Iicense.

Florida

Florida Insurance RequiredMinimum Limits
Personal Injury Coverage$10,000 Personal Injury Protection (PIP)
Property Damage Liability Coverage$10,000 Property Damage Liability (PDL)

While Florida insurance laws state that you must maintain the Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) coverage throughout the licensing and registration of your vehicle, you’ll be happy to know that the coverage is broad.

For instance, in the event of automobile crash not only will PIP cover you and your vehicle but also covers:

  • Your child
  • Members of your household
  • Passengers who don’t have PIP Insurance (only if they don’t own a vehicle)
  • If you are injured in someone else’s vehicle
  • If, as a pedestrian or bicyclist, you’re struck by a vehicle
  • If your child is injured on a school bus

Florida is a “no-fault” insurance state, which means that drivers are required to carry coverage that will pay for their own medical bills regardless of who was at fault in the accident.

For more information visit the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles

The minimum coverage includes:

  • $10,000 to cover personal injury protection (PIP)
  • $10,000 to cover property damage liability (PDL)

Bodily Injury Liability (BI) coverage is not required to drive in the state of Florida. In fact, they are the only state without that requirement. Many insurance companies will not sell a policy without minimum bodily injury limits, though.

Georgia

Minimum Car Insurance Requirements in GeorgiaStats
Bodily Injury Liability$25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability$25,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury$25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Property Damage$25,000 with a $250, $500, or $1000 deductible

Liability insurance pays all individuals — drivers, passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, etc. — who are owed compensation for property damage and/or injuries resulting from a car accident that you or anyone under your policy causes.

Georgia is an “at-fault” accident state. This means, if you are the at-fault driver during an accident, you will be held liable for any personal injury or property claims.

As such, liability insurance is required in the state of Georgia at these minimum coverage amounts:

  • $25,000 to cover Injury or death of one person in an accident you caused
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death of more than one person in an accident you caused
  • $25,000 to cover property damage in an accident you caused

Remember, these amounts are minimum requirements and do not cover injury, death, or damage to yourself or your own passengers! That will require additional coverage.

Your liability coverage does, however, kick in no matter who is driving your car, and if you are driving a rental vehicle.

Hawaii

Insurance TypeInsurance Required
Bodily Injury Liability Coverage$20,000 per person
$40,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability Coverage$10,000 minimum
PIP/"No-fault" Coverage$10,000 minimum

Hawaii’s Compulsory Liability Insurance Law requires that all drivers purchase minimum liability insurance coverages in order to get out on the open road. Failure to maintain basic liability coverage is not only dangerous but could cause you to incur strict penalties.

In fact, if you are cited for driving without insurance more than twice in a five-year period, you could be slapped with jail time. As such, it’s better to be safe than sorry and always make sure you protect yourself and your loved ones by staying insured.

You do not have to carry comprehensive insurance coverage unless you purchase your car via a lender who mandates such.

The limits you must maintain for the duration of your car’s registration period are as follows:

  • $20,000 liability coverage per person/$40,000 per accident to cover the expense of injuries to other drivers for an accident you cause
  • $10,000 liability coverage to cover property damage expenses to the other driver’s vehicle for an accident you cause, not including your own car
  • $10,000 PIP/no-fault coverage to cover your medical bills and expenses in the event of an accident

Hawaii is one of the few “no-fault” car insurance states. If you were to get into an auto accident, your policy’s personal injury protection (PIP) benefits would come into play.

Idaho

Let’s look at your Idaho car insurance minimum liability coverage requirements:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death per person resulting from an accident you cause
  • $50,000 for total bodily injury or death liability resulting from an accident you cause
  • $15,000 to cover property damage per accident resulting from a collision you cause

Idaho is a “fault” state, meaning the state’s car insurance laws hold the at-fault driver in an accident responsible for any losses incurred as a result of their negligent driving, such as physical injuries, property damage, lost wages, etc.

Illinois

As such, liability insurance is required in the state of Illinois at these minimum coverage amounts:

  • $25,000 to cover Injury or death of one person in an accident you caused
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death of more than one person in an accident you caused
  • $20,000 to cover property damage in an accident you caused

Illinois also requires all motorists to carry uninsured/underinsured coverage.

Illinois is an “at-fault” accident state. This means, if you are the at-fault driver during an accident, you will be held liable for any personal injury or property claims.

Indiana

Insurance RequiredCoverages
Bodily Injury Liability Coverage$25,000 per person
$50,000 per accident
Uninsured Motorist Coverage$25,000 per person
$50,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability Coverage$25,000 minimum
Underinsured Motorist Coverage$50,000 minimum

The table above details the minimum car insurance coverages required under Indiana state law. Let’s take a closer look at what each of these means for you:

  • $25,000 bodily injury liability coverage per person to cover the cost of injury or death of an individual due to an accident you cause
  • $50,000 bodily injury liability coverage per accident to cover the total costs of bodily injury or death liability due to an accident you cause
  • $25,000 uninsured motorist coverage per person to cover the costs of any injuries you incur if you get into an accident with an uninsured driver
  • $50,000 uninsured motorist coverage per accident to cover the total costs of injuries resulting from an accident with an uninsured driver
  • $25,000 property damage liability coverage to cover the total property damage costs of another party or parties due to an accident you cause
  • $50,000 underinsured motorist coverage to cover the costs of injuries you incur due to an accident with another driver whose insurance was insufficient to pay for your total damages

Iowa

Iowa requires drivers to have the following minimum liability insurance if their license has been suspended or revoked:

  • $20,000 to pay for the injuries of one person
  • $40,000 to pay for the injuries of more than one person
  • $15,000 to pay for property damage

Kansas

Kansas’s minimum liability insurance coverage requirements are as follows:

  • $25,000 for injury or death per person in an accident caused by you
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or the death per accident the insured caused by you
  • $25,000 for property damage in an accident the insured driver caused by you

State law requires drivers to also carry uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage with minimums of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.

Kentucky

To drive in Kentucky, you must have coverage at these levels: 25/50/25. To spell it out:

  • $25,000 – Bodily injury liability for one person
  • $50,000 – Bodily injury liability total for an accident
  • $25,000 – Property damage liability
  • $10,000 – Personal Injury Protection (PIP)

Alternatively, Kentucky residents can opt for a single-limit policy of $60,000.

Uninsured/underinsured motorist protection is required at the level of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident but can be rejected in writing.

Louisiana

Louisiana requires that you carry, at the minimum, the following amounts:

  • $15,000 covers injury/death per person.
  • $30,000 covers injuries or death per accident.
  • $25,000 covers property damage per accident.

Maine

The basic minimum requirements in Maine that all motorists must have for liability insurance are:

  • $50,000 to cover the death or injury per person
  • $100,000 to cover the total death or injury per accident
  • $25,000 to cover property damage per accident

Maine is different from other states because it requires drivers to have uninsured/underinsured (UM and UIM) insurance and Medpay insurance in addition to the usual coverages.

These required amounts are only for the minimum amounts. Since these coverages pay you rather than the other driver, you may want to carry additional coverage because in the event of an accident your payout to injured victims could quickly run out.

Maryland

Maryland Insurance RequiredMinimum Limits
Bodily Injury Liability (of one person)$30,000
Bodily Injury Liability (two or more people)$60,000
Property Damage Liability$15,000

Maryland is a “fault” state, which means that the driver who caused the collision must assume responsibility for any harmful outcomes. Of course, the at-fault driver’s insurance provider will cover these losses within policy limits, and that’s why liability coverage is required.

Massachusetts

Type of CoverageAmount
Bodily Injury Liability Coverage$20,000 per one person
$40,000 total per accident
Property Damage Liability Coverage$5,000 per accident
No-Fault Personal Injury Coverage$8,000
Uninsured Motorist Coverage$20,000 per one person
$40,000 per accident

Massachusetts is a no-fault state, which means that your insurance provider will cover you and your passengers’ medical expenses in the event of an accident, regardless of whether the accident was your fault.

In the event of serious injuries that result in permanent disfigurement or over $2,000 in medical expenses, it is still possible to file a claim against the driver who is responsible for the accident.

Michigan

Type of CoverageLegal MinimumNew Minimum as of July 1, 2020
Personal Injury Protection (PIP)Unlimited; policy pays out all reasonable costs for injuries$50,000 (for drivers enrolled in Medicaid)
$250,000 all others
Personal Property Protection (PPI)$1 million$1 million
Bodily Injury Liability$20,000 per person
$40,000 per incident
$50,000 per person
$100,000 per incident
Property Damage Liability$10,000 per incident$10,000 per incident

Under the new PIP Choice law, Michigan drivers who are on Medicare will be permitted to opt-out entirely of carrying PIP coverage. All other drivers will be able to select from several levels of coverage. Those levels are:

  • $50,000 (for drivers on Medicaid only)
  • $250,000
  • $500,000
  • Unlimited

Minnesota

Type of CoverageMinimum Limits
Personal Injury Protection (PIP)$40,000 per person per accident. ($20,000 for medical expenses and $20,000 for non-medical expenses)
Bodily Injury Liability$30,000 per person
$60,000 for two or more people (per incident)
Property Damage Liability$10,000
Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury$25,000 per person
$50,000 for two or more people (per incident)
Underinsured Motorist Bodily Injury$25,000 per person
$50,000 for two or more people (per incident)

Here are a few other things you need to know about no-fault insurance in Minnesota:

  • It covers medical expenses, wage loss, other services such as child care, and provides $2,000 for funeral expenses
  • A no-fault claim can be made up to six months after the accident
  • No-fault benefits on your car insurance don’t apply to accidents on a snowmobile or motorcycle, but you can purchase a separate policy for either of these
  • You can increase your PIP limits well beyond the minimum

Mississippi

Mississippi requires a minimum coverage that your insurance policy must cover in order to legally drive in the state. They operate under a 20/40/10 minimum liability limit. What in the world does this mean for you? Well, below we’ve broken up exactly what this kind of coverage means

  • 20 = $20,000 that can pay for bodily injury per person
  • 40 = $40,000 that can pay for total bodily injury per accident
  • 10 = $10,000 that can pay for property damage per accident

Missouri

Missouri requires liability insurance at these minimum coverage amounts:

  • $25,000 for injury or death per person in an accident you caused
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death per accident you caused
  • $10,000 for property damage per accident you caused

Missouri also requires all motorists to carry uninsured motorist coverage (UM) for greater protection beyond liability. UM can protect you and your passengers if the at-fault driver is uninsured or if you’ve been in a hit-and-run accident. Missouri requires UM coverage of $25,000 in bodily injury per person and $50,000 in bodily injury per accident, but UM doesn’t cover vehicle damage after an accident.

Montana

Liability insurance is required in the state of Montana at these minimum coverage amounts:

  • $25,000 to cover Injury or death of one person in an accident you caused
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death of more than one person in an accident you caused
  • $20,000 to cover property damage in an accident you caused

Remember, these amounts are minimum requirements and do not cover injury, death, or damage to yourself or your own passengers! That will require additional coverage.

Your liability coverage does, however, kick in no matter who is driving your car.

Nebraska

Liability insurance pays all individuals — drivers, passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, etc. — who are owed compensation for property damage and/or injuries resulting from a car accident that you or anyone under your policy causes.

Nebraska is an “at-fault” accident state. This means, if you are the at-fault driver during an accident, you will be held liable for any personal injury or property claims.

As such, liability insurance is required in the state of Nebraska at these minimum coverage amounts:

  • $25,000 to cover Injury or death per person in an accident you caused
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death per accident you caused
  • $25,000 to cover property damage per accident you caused

Nebraska also requires all motorists to carry uninsured and underinsured coverage at least equal to the minimum amounts for bodily injury and property damage. Agents are required by law to offer more coverage than the minimum, which is highly recommended.

  • $25,000 to cover your own injury per person caused by an uninsured/underinsured driver
  • $50,000 to cover total injuries or death per accident caused by an uninsured/underinsured driver

Nevada

Nevada state minimum required car insurance are below.

  • $25,000 per person to cover the bodily injury or death of any individual resulting from an accident the vehicle owner/driver causes
  • $50,000 per accident to cover total bodily injury or death liability resulting from an accident the vehicle owner/driver causes
  • $20,000 per accident to cover the total property damage resulting from an accident the vehicle owner/driver causes

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is the only state that doesn’t require you to carry any car insurance coverage. However, choosing to forego insurance altogether may expose you to great financial liability and possible financial ruin in the case an at-fault accident.

New Hampshire is a fault state (also commonly referred to as “tort”), meaning the person who was at fault in the car accident is also legally and financially responsible for any resulting damages.

All drivers in New Hampshire are required to carry minimum liability insurance levels of 25/50/25 to satisfy basic overage. This means that car owners must carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $25,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle

Additionally, if you do choose to carry liability insurance, New Hampshire mandates that you also car Medical Payments Coverage (Med Pay) of at least $1,000 to cover medical expenses after a crash regardless of who is the responsible party.

If you choose to carry liability insurance, New Hampshire does require you to carry Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage at the same level of your liability coverage.

New Jersey

New Jersey Minimum Car Insurance Coverage Requirements

New Jersey Minimum Insurance Required (Basic Policy)Minimum Limits
Bodily Injury CoverageNone required, but optional starting at a minimum of $10,000 per person and $10,000 per accident
Property Damage Coverage$5,000
Personal Injury Protection (PIP)$15,000 per person, per accident
Up to $250,000 for brain and spinal cord injuries

Liability insurance pays anyone owed compensation when you are in an accident.

  • $15,000 covers injuries or death per person or per accident for yourself or anyone under your policy.
  • $250,000 covers brain or spinal cord injuries for yourself or anyone under your policy.
  • $5,000 covers property damage.

New Mexico

You need to have bodily injury and property damage insurance in the following MINIMUM amounts if you live in the state of New Mexico.

  • $25,000 for injuries to one person in an accident
  • $50,000 for injuries to all people in an accident
  • $10,000 for property damages caused by an accident

New Mexico also requires you to have uninsured motorist coverage, but you can opt-out of this coverage. If you want to refuse uninsured motorist coverage, you will need to sign a form and give it to your insurance provider.

New York

New York is a no-fault state which means that your insurance carrier would pay for the damages in an accident irrespective of who was at fault.

Below is the required minimum amount of car insurance in New York.

  • Personal injury Liability Coverage – $25,000 per person with a maximum of $50,000 per accident
  • Liability Coverage for Death – $50,000 per person with a maximum of $100,000 per accident
  • Property Damage Liability Coverage – $10,000 per accident
  • Personal Injury Protection – $50,000 per person
  • Uninsured Motorists Coverage – $25,000 per person with a maximum of $50,000 per accident

North Carolina

The mandatory minimum you must carry in North Carolina according to North Carolina law G.S. 20-279.21 is listed in the table above, but to recap:

  • $30,000 for injuries to one person.
  • $60,000 for injuries to more than one person.
  • $25,000 for property damage.

This minimum liability coverage is known as 30/60/25.

Experts recommend if at all possible to purchase more than the minimum amount for your state.

North Dakota

Insurance RequiredMinimum Limits: 25/50/25
Bodily Injury Liability$25,000 per person
$50,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability$25,000

The basic coverage requirements in North Dakota which all motorists must have for liability insurance are:

  • $25,000 to cover the death or injury of one person
  • $50,000 to cover the death or injury of more than one person
  • $25,000 to cover property damage

Ohio

Below are the required minimum limits for Ohio state.

Coverage TypeLegal Minimum
Bodily Injury Liability$25,000 per person
$50,000 per incident
Property Damage Liability$25,000

Remember, these limits are the minimum required limits. We encourage drivers to look at purchasing more insurance coverage.

Oklahoma

Minimum liability coverage in Oklahoma, as noted above, needs to consist of:

  • $25,000 to cover the injury or death of a single person
  • $50,000 to cover the injury or death of more than one person
  • $25,000 to cover damage to personal property

Oregon

Oregon follows what’s known as a 25/50/20 liability coverage system. Below we’ve gone through what exactly this means.

  • 25 = $25,000 to pay for the injuries of ONE person
  • 50 = $50,000 to pay for the injuries of MORE THAN ONE person
  • 20 = $20,000 to pay for property damages

Keep in mind as well, Oregon law also requires that drivers also have the following coverage (in addition to the minimum coverage rates above)

  • $15,000 for Personal Injury Protection (also known as Medical Payments/MedPay)
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per total accident for Uninsured Motor Coverage

Pennsylvania

All Pennsylvania drivers must have car insurance. State minimum car insurance requirements are:

  • $5,000 of Medical Benefits coverage (also known as First-Party Benefits), a form of personal injury protection, to cover medical expenses for yourself or others, regardless of fault
  • $15,000 in liability insurance to cover medical costs for injuries to one person, capped at $30,000 per accident
  • $5,000 to cover property damage if you’re at fault

Rhode Island

Rhode Island requires drivers to be covered by a state minimum amount of coverage in order to legally operate on the road. The Department of Business’s Insurance division states that Rhode Island’s minimum coverage operates under a 25/50/25 minimum liability rate.

What does that mean for you? Let’s break things down.

  • 25 = $25,000 of bodily injury coverage to cover the injuries of just one person
  • 50 = $50,000 that can pay the injuries of more than one person
  • 25 = $25,000 to cover any property damaged in a car accident

You should also note that the state requires you to have $25,000 worth of coverage to use in case you get in an accident with someone who is under- or uninsured.

South Carolina

Because South Carolina is an at-fault state, state residents are required to carry liability auto insurance that meets at least the following minimums:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner/driver of the insured vehicle
  • $50,000 for total bodily injury or death liability in an accident caused by the owner/driver of the insured vehicle
  • $25,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner/driver of the insured vehicle.

South Dakota

South Dakota’s minimum required car insurance limits are listed below.

  • $25,000 bodily injury liability coverage per person to cover the costs associated with the injury or death of an individual as the result of an accident you cause
  • $50,000 bodily injury liability coverage per accident to cover the costs associated with the total bodily injury or death liability resulting from an accident you cause
  • $25,000 property damage liability coverage to cover the costs associated with property damages incurred by another individual or individuals resulting from an accident you cause

While not mandatory in all states, South Dakota car insurance laws also mandate that drivers carry uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages that match their selected liability policy limits.

Uninsured motorist coverage is there to protect you if you ever get into a crash for which you are not responsible, are injured, and the at-fault driver does not have a valid policy to pay for your damages or the collision is a hit and run incident.

Underinsured motorist coverage also offers protection for you as the policyholder. In the event that you get into a collision for which you are not responsible, and the other driver does not have sufficient coverages to pay for your damages, the underinsured motorist coverage will kick in to cover the rest.

Tennessee

Tennessee minimum car insurance requirements are below:

  • $25,000 per person to cover the bodily injury or death of an individual resulting from an accident you cause
  • $50,000 per accident to cover the total bodily injury or death liability resulting from an accident you cause
  • $15,000 property damage liability coverage to cover the total costs of another party or party’s property damage resulting from an accident you cause

Texas

Texas requires drivers to carry at minimum the following auto insurance coverages:

  • Bodily Injury Liability $30,000 per person
  • Bodily Injury Liability $60,000 per accident
  • Property Damage Liability $25,000

Utah

Car insurance is a requirement in Utah — driving without insurance is illegal. In Utah, drivers must have bodily injury and property damage liability insurance, as well as personal injury protection (PIP). Personal injury protection covers medical, rehabilitation, earning loss, and funeral costs.

The MINIMUM coverage allowed is in the following amounts:

  • $26,000 to cover costs of injury or death to any one person in an accident
  • $65,000 to cover costs of injury or death to two or more people in an accident
  • $15,000 to cover costs of damage to property in an accident
  • $3,000 PIP coverage per person

If you chose to, you can opt for a combined single limit policy. If you do this, the minimum amount is $80,000 for bodily injury and property damage coverage (you will still need PIP coverage).

Vermont

The basic coverage requirements in Vermont which all drivers must have for liability insurance are:

  • $25,000 to cover the death or injury of one person
  • $50,000 to cover the death or injury of more than one person
  • $10,000 to cover property damage

Virginia

The basic coverage requirements in Virginia which all motorists must have for liability insurance are:

  • $25,000 to cover the death or injury of one person
  • $50,000 to cover the death or injury of more than one person
  • $20,000 to cover property damage

Washington

TYPE OF COVERAGEAMOUNT
Bodily Injury Liability Coverage$25,000 per one person
$50,000 total per accident
Property Damage Liability Coverage$10,000 per accident

Required minimum limits for Washington state are as follows:

  • Bodily Injury – $25,000 per person
  • Bodily Injury – $50,000 total per accident
  • Property Damage Liability – $10,000 per accident

West Virginia

West Virginia is a “fault” state meaning that it follows a traditional fault-based system when it comes to financial responsibility for property damage and injuries resulting from a crash.

Basic coverage in West Virginia increased in 2016 to a required minimum car of 25/50/20 for all motorists. This mandates that all car owners carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

$25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle, and $20,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle.

West Virginia does not require you to carry Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage, but legislators do mandate all auto insurance companies in the state to offer consumers the optional maximum coverage of 100/300/50.

Declining to carry any form of uninsured/underinsured coverage means that you’re foregoing insurance that can protect you and your passengers if the at-fault driver has no insurance, or if you’re the victim of a hit-and-run.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is a traditional, “at fault” state, meaning that the person who was at fault for causing the car accident is also responsible for any resulting harm and damages.

All drivers in Wisconsin are required to carry minimum liability insurance levels of 25/50/10 to satisfy basic overage. This means that car owners must carry the following minimum levels of liability insurance:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $50,000 for total bodily injury or death in an accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle
  • $10,000 for property damage per accident caused by the owner of the insured vehicle

The state of Wisconsin requires its residents to carry the following limits for uninsured (UM) and underinsured (UIM) motorist coverage:

  • $25,000 for injury to one person for both UM and UIM
  • $50,000 for injury to more than one person for UM and UIM

Wyoming

Wyoming follows something known as a 25/50/20 minimum coverage, explained for you down below:

  • 25 = $25,000 for the coverage of any bodily injuries/death of ONE person
  • 50 = $50,000 for the coverage of any bodily injuries/death of MULTIPLE people
  • 20 = $20,000 for the coverage of any property damage

Something to make note of here is that this is the MINIMUM coverage you can have in order to legally drive in Wyoming. It’s always recommended to at least consider getting above this minimum, as it may not always be enough to protect you.

Your insurance provider will only pay up to the limits you’ve gotten your policy for, so if you’re ever in a bad enough accident that requires more than that, you’ll have to pay out of pocket in order to cover it.

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Car Insurance Facts and Questions about Moving

You may run into some tricky situations when dealing with out-of-state car insurance. Some tougher questions often asked about insurance coverage involve students away at school and snowbirds. Snowbirds refer to people who live the winter months in warmer states like Florida and the summer months in cooler states like Ohio.

First, let’s dig into students away at school.

Can you stay on your parent’s car insurance if you move to a different state?

Parents are often faced with the decision of where their children will end up at college. Some kids may choose to live at home and attend college close to home, while others travel to out-of-state schools. So, what do you do about your insurance?

Your best bet is to talk to your agent. Each insurance company can be a little different when it comes to guidelines for out-of-state school use.

Most companies will allow a student to take a car to school and still remain on their parent’s policy. There are some things you should consider if your child does take their car out of state.

  • Adding extra coverage – if the car is parked outside, it could be more susceptible to weather damage or vandalism.
  • Talk to your agent about discounts – some companies offer good student discounts.
  • Use of car – maybe your child isn’t taking his or her car to school. Talk to your agent about how the car may not be used as much and if you are eligible for a discount.

What should snowbirds know about car insurance?

Snowbirds live in northern states during the summer months and travel to warmer states, like Florida or Arizona, in the winter months. This can be a little tricky in regard to your car insurance.

Where is your primary residence? What are the laws for the state you are spending your summer?

Florida law states that you are a legal resident if you are in the state of Florida for more than 90 days. Arizona is a little more forgiving for snowbirds. If you live in Arizona less than seven months out of the year, you are considered a part-time resident, and you do not need to register your vehicle.

We suggest if you are spending a considerable amount of time in another state, you must inform your current insurance carrier and make sure you have no gaps in your car insurance coverage.

What happens if you don’t change my car insurance address?

Insurance companies rate based on where your car is being garaged and the primary area where it is being driven. If you do not change your address with your insurance carrier, you will not be properly insured.

You also run into the issue of fraud. Not being honest on an insurance contract is a breach of the contract. This means you may not have coverage in the event of an accident.

Bottom Line — Changing Car Insurance when Moving

Moving is stressful, and car insurance is probably the last thing you want to deal with when you have all the changes in moving.

States have a grace period for new residents to get settled in their new state before requiring car registration to be changed. You must remember in order to get your new registration; you must have insurance valid for the same state as you are registering.

Ready to start getting quotes for car insurance quotes in your new state? Enter your ZIP code to use our free comparison quoting tool to start saving today.

References:

  1. https://www.flhsmv.gov/new-resident/
  2. https://dmv.ny.gov/registration/registration-refunds-and-transfer-credits-surrendered-plates
  3. https://drivinglaws.aaa.com/tag/registration-for-non-residents/
  4. https://thelawdictionary.org/article/is-it-illegal-to-have-auto-insurance-in-a-different-state-than-the-one-in-which-you-live/
  5. https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/tort
  6. http://www.aldoi.gov/consumers/autoinsurance.aspx
  7. http://doa.alaska.gov/dmv/office/
  8. http://doa.alaska.gov/dmv/forms/pdfs/478.pdf
  9. https://www.azdot.gov/motor-vehicles/faq/vehicle-services/mandatory-insurance
  10. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/california
  11. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/new-colorado-0
  12. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/DR2300.pdf
  13. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/registration-requirements
  14. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/connecticut
  15. https://www.fandpnet.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/DE-PIP-and-UM-UIM-FAQs.pdf
  16. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/delaware
  17. https://www.dmv.de.gov/home/contact_info/index.shtml
  18. https://www.flhsmv.gov/ddl/frfaqgen.html
  19. https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/georgia-car-insurance-requirements.html
  20. https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/hawaii-no-fault-car-insurance.html
  21. https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/idaho-car-insurance-laws.html
  22. https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/illinois-car-insurance-requirements.html
  23. https://www.in.gov/idoi/2579.htm#5
  24. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/kansas
  25. https://drive.ky.gov/Motor-Vehicle-Licensing/Pages/Mandatory-Insurance.aspx
  26. https://www.mass.gov/
  27. https://www.nolo.com/
  28. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/new-hampshire
  29. https://www.ncdoi.com/_publications/consumer%20guide%20to%20automobile%20insurance_cau1.pdf
  30. http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/PDF/BySection/Chapter_20/GS_20-279.21.pdf
  31. http://www.dbr.ri.gov/documents/divisions/insurance/property_casualty/com_guide-auto_insur.PDF
  32. https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-uninsured-motorists
  33. https://www.wvinsurance.gov/consumerservices/Consumer-Services/Mandatory-Limits
  34. https://www.thehartford.com/aarp/car-insurance/wisconsin/state-driving

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