Car insurance in Tyler, Texas [Rates + Comparison Guide]

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Fort Lauderdale StatisticsDetails
Population104,796
City Density Per Square Mile2,126 people
Average Cost of Insurance$5,617.62
Cheapest Car Insurance CompanyUSAA

With all of the many options available, shopping for car insurance in Tyler can be confusing. You may feel frustrated and wonder how you’ll ever find the right coverage.

To save you time and money, this is your guide to all of your car insurance options in the “Rose Capital of America.” We’ll cover the factors that go into setting rates there, from age and gender to zip codes, so that you can make an informed decision.

We’ll also examine some of the most vital parts of living in Tyler, including the state of the local economy, crime rates, and traffic levels.

So, get ready to learn all you need to know and then some. Enter your zip code above to start comparison shopping today.

Table of Contents

The Cost of Car Insurance in Tyler

Getting affordable car insurance rates can be overwhelming. You want to make sure you can afford to get the best coverage at the best price.

The number of choices available doesn’t make the search any easier. Good news! We’ve brought everything you need to you here to help you make a sound decision: insurers’ average rates and the factors that go into setting them.

So, let’s get ready to explore the average costs of car insurance in Tyler and how to compare them to suit your own situation.

– Male vs. Female vs. Age

Your age and gender are among the biggest factors insurers use to determine rates. Younger, less experienced drivers tend to pay more than older drivers. As you’ll notice below, the rates tend to decrease with age.

The median age in Tyler is 33, which means that the average driver there won’t pay high premiums.

Age17253560Cheapest RateCheapest Age 
Average Annual Rate$7572.63$3035.85$2453.65$2331.05$2331.0560

Drivers age 35 have the second lowest premium rate in Tyler. Most drivers of the median age pay this rate. Beyond age, between genders, there are also major differences in cost:

  • Male’s Average Premium: $3,848.30
  • Female’s Average Premium: $3,644.54

Insurers consider males to be higher risk drivers based on accident data, which is why they have higher premiums than females in Tyler.

The table below shows how gender and age form rates in Tyler.

DemographicRate
Married 60-year old female$2,273.22
Married 60-year old male$2,388.88
Married 35-year old female$2,423.79
Married 35-year old male$2,483.50
Single 25-year old female$2,956.57
Single 25-year old male$3,115.14
Average$3,848.30
Single 17-year old female$6,924.59
Single 17-year old male$8,220.67

Married couples are often considered less risky to insure, therefore, as in this case, their rates can be lower than their single counterparts. Overall, drivers age 60 pay the cheapest rates and teens have the highest rates.

– Cheapest Zip Codes in Tyler

Rates can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood in the same city or town. Again, it comes down to safety risks and how accident rates, crime, or even natural disasters can affect certain areas. Where does your neighborhood rank?

ZipAverage Annual Rate
75701$5,617.62
75798$5,621.14
75707$5,625.38
75708$5,664.69
75703$5,695.60
75702$5,764.97
75709$5,818.40
75704$5,825.39
75799$5,838.48
75705$5,857.23
75706$5,963.97

The difference in rates between the most and least expensive zip codes is less than $400. In bigger cities, the price differences between zip codes can soar into thousands of dollars.

– What’s the Best Car Insurance Company in Tyler?

Insurance buyers typically factor cost into their decisions about providers. Below are the cheapest providers available in Tyler.

– Cheapest Car Insurance Rates by Company

GroupMarried 35-year old femaleMarried 35-year old maleMarried 60-year old femaleMarried 60-year old maleSingle 17-year old femaleSingle 17-year old maleSingle 25-year old femaleSingle 25-year old maleAverage
Allstate$3,534.09$3,559.35$3,487.08$3,487.08$9,407.33$11,340.10$4,366.47$4,540.41$5,465.24
American Family$2,470.33$2,755.90$2,340.93$2,685.04$6,718.99$8,776.18$3,576.42$4,076.76$4,175.07
Geico$2,436.41$2,639.25$2,373.41$2,711.69$5,356.39$5,528.79$2,631.37$2,604.76$3,285.26
Nationwide$2,297.26$2,332.90$2,033.98$2,149.80$6,488.00$8,315.14$2,697.68$2,914.90$3,653.71
Progressive$2,453.46$2,321.57$2,194.73$2,229.00$10,532.25$11,770.40$2,905.74$2,941.03$4,668.52
State Farm$2,114.16$2,114.16$1,888.20$1,888.20$5,190.65$6,639.57$2,307.10$2,378.32$3,065.05
USAA$1,660.84$1,661.36$1,594.20$1,571.37$4,778.52$5,174.51$2,211.21$2,349.78$2,625.22

Overall, USAA, an insurer for active military personnel and veterans, offers the lowest rates in the city by age group and gender.

This gives you a snapshot into how much you can expect pay based on your own demographics, but keep in mind that rates can vary significantly based on these factors from company to company.

– Best Car Insurance for Commute Rates

Besides your age and gender, another major part of your insurance rates is your regular commute; the longer it is, the more you can tend to pay.

The average Texas driver travels 15,533 miles a year. Most insurers classify this as a long commute distance.

The table below shows which companies in Tyler base their prices on mileage.

Group10 miles commute. 6000 annual mileage.25 miles commute. 12000 annual mileage.Average
Allstate$5,330.09$5,600.39$5,465.24
American Family$4,175.07$4,175.07$4,175.07
Geico$3,224.82$3,345.70$3,285.26
Nationwide$3,653.71$3,653.71$3,653.71
Progressive$4,668.52$4,668.52$4,668.52
State Farm$3,065.04$3,065.04$3,065.04
USAA$2,592.18$2,658.27$2,625.23

The good news is that most companies don’t change their prices for 10-mile versus 25-mile commutes. But, keep this factor in mind when you shop around for the best rates.

– Best Car Insurance for Coverage Level Rates

If price is your primary concern, you’ll often settle for the lowest cost insurance coverage. The most expensive, or higher, coverage will often pay for the most damage in most situations, such as full coverage premiums.

You never know what will happen. A lightning strike could cause a tree limb to dent your hood, or someone could rear-end you in traffic. In these situations, it helps to be prepared ahead of time and buy enough coverage for protection.

Below, are the cost differences between coverage levels in Tyler.

GroupHighLowMediumAverage
Allstate$5,639.43$5,338.53$5,417.75$5,465.24
American Family$4,652.28$3,860.27$4,012.65$4,175.07
Geico$3,527.66$3,090.38$3,237.73$3,285.26
Nationwide$3,552.31$3,910.28$3,498.53$3,653.71
Progressive$4,940.76$4,417.92$4,646.88$4,668.52
State Farm$3,233.02$2,905.88$3,056.24$3,065.05
USAA$2,735.83$2,526.58$2,613.27$2,625.23

As shown above, the price difference from the highest to the lowest coverage averages roughly $300. If you can’t afford the highest level, the “middle ground” of medium coverage could be a more affordable option.

– Best Car Insurance for Credit History Rates

Whether it’s high, low, or somewhere in-between, your credit score can affect not just your ability to buy a car, but also your car insurance and rates. The better your score, the lower your premiums.

If you have poor credit, however, your outlook might not be so bleak. Some providers don’t always pay a lot of attention to credit scores.

GroupFairGoodPoorAverage
Allstate$5,091.46$4,362.28$6,941.98$5,465.24
American Family$3,632.97$3,187.87$5,704.36$4,175.07
Geico$2,870.53$1,914.30$5,070.95$3,285.26
Nationwide$3,520.64$3,060.07$4,380.41$3,653.71
Progressive$4,546.49$4,218.93$5,240.15$4,668.52
State Farm$2,701.84$2,153.07$4,340.23$3,065.05
USAA$2,235.31$1,803.14$3,837.23$2,625.23

Allstate and American Family top the list of the insurers who charge drivers the highest premiums for poor credit. Generally, the price difference between poor and good credit can amount to as much as $2,000.

– Best Car Insurance for Driving Record Rates

Even one driving offense can increase your insurance rates, but we might not always think about just how much they can rise as a result.

Look below to find out how much some of the most common penalties can affect your premiums.

GroupClean recordWith 1 accidentWith 1 DUIWith 1 speeding violationAverage
Allstate$4,221.90$6,565.88$6,851.27$4,221.90$5,879.68
American Family$3,811.10$4,830.75$4,247.31$3,811.10$4,296.39
Geico$2,787.55$3,694.04$3,069.28$3,590.17$3,183.62
Nationwide$3,173.60$3,173.60$4,687.05$3,580.58$3,678.08
Progressive$4,066.54$5,287.00$4,748.61$4,571.94$4,700.72
State Farm$2,711.10$3,125.89$3,712.09$2,711.10$3,183.03
USAA$1,947.67$2,895.27$3,421.48$2,236.48$2,754.81

As shown above, on average, a speeding ticket won’t raise your rates as much as an accident or a DUI. The best way to keep your rates low is to maintain a clean driving record.

– Car Insurance Factors in Tyler

But, the above factors aren’t the only ones that can affect the cost of your car insurance. Below, we’ll explore how the local economy, such as the job opportunities and employment levels, influence premiums.

So, get ready to read on about how the major economic aspects of Tyler play into car insurance rates there.

– Growth and Prosperity

The growth and prosperity of a region can drive business activity and the overall job market.

Data USA data shows that the local economy employs 46,000 people. Between 2016 and 2017 the population in Tyler grew from 101,946 to 102,561 — a 0.603% increase — and its median household income rose from $44,507 to $46,463, a rise of 4.39 percent.

  • Largest industries: Health Care & Social Assistance (9,428 people), Retail Trade (6,547 people), and Accommodation & Food Services (4,101 people).
  • Highest paying industries: Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction ($101,354), Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting, & Mining ($55,417), and Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services ($52,136).

Tyler’s economic figures look solid as the city continues to grow not just in population, but in average household income.

– Median Household Income

The amount you earn affects how much of your income goes to paying car insurance. Below, we’ll examine the average annual household income in Tyler.

Tyler, Texas Median Household Income

The median household income in Tyler is $46,463, which is less than the median annual income of $60,336 across the entire United States.

The average Tyler resident pays $5,617.62 a year on car insurance, and the percentage of income going to car insurance is just over twelve percent.

This percentage is fairly high based on the average annual income. Many of us have regular expenses to cover, such as rent or a mortgage, groceries, utilities, etc.

The ratio of your income that goes to insurance may be higher or lower based on how much you earn. To find out how much of your income goes to insurance, try our free calculator below.

CalculatorPro

– Homeownership in Tyler

With the added responsibility of owning a home, homeowners can pay less than renters for their car insurance. Below are some stats about the number of homeowners in Tyler and the property values there.

52.7 percent of Tyler residents owned homes in 2017, which is lower than the national average of 63.9 percent, and lower than the state average of 61.3 percent.

The median property values aren’t too high in Tyler. The average is 0.668 lower than the national average of $217,600. Between 2016 and 2017 the median property value in Tyler increased from $140,000 to $145,400, or 3.86 percent.

Tyler, Texas Property Values

As shown, most households in Tyler have property values in the $150,000 to  $175,000 range.

– Education in Tyler

If you are thinking about attending school in Tyler, you’re probably wondering about your options there.

The largest institutions of higher education in the area are the University of Texas at Tyler, which awarded 2,276 degrees in 2017, followed by Tyler Junior College with 2,161, and Texas College, which granted 126 diplomas.crsecond largest institution, Tyler Junior College, is one of the largest community colleges in Texas. It offers online courses for more than 130 degrees and certificates in:

  • healthcare professions
  • manufacturing, transportation, and industry
  • general studies, business and entrepreneurship
  • public service
  • creative and communication arts
  • science and technology

With the high percentages of Tyler employees in sales and related and office and administrative support occupations, the TJC offers courses and certificates suited to those and other fields.

This video showcases the history of the third-largest institution of higher learning in Tyler: Texas College.

– Wage by Race and Ethnicity in Common Jobs

The chart below shows a breakdown of how much the top races and ethnicities earn in Tyler in the most common professions.

Wage by Race and Ethnicity in Common Jobs - Tyler, Texas

In 2017, Asians were the highest paid race/ethnicity of workers in Tyler. They earned 1.25 times more than White workers, who made the second highest salary of any race/ethnicity and in all fields.

The chart below shows how much of the top three races and ethnicities’ salaries in Tyler goes to pay car insurance premiums.

Race/EthnicityAverage Full-Time SalaryPercentage of Income Going to Car Insurance
Asian$64,9478.65%
White$52,07210.79%
American Indian$45,53812.34%

– Wage by Gender in Common Jobs

Despite the debate over equal pay for both genders, women on average still earn less than men. Below are salaries for males and females in Tyler in the same fields.

Wage by Gender in Common Jobs - Tyler, Texas

In every job shown above, females earned slightly less than males. Below are the genders’ average salaries in Tyler:

  • Males’ Average Salary: $64,953
  • Females’ Average Salary: $45,959

Males in Tyler earn 1.41 times more than females. The income inequality in Tyler (measured using the Gini index) is 0.482, which is higher than the national average.

– Poverty by Age and Gender

As with the disparity in wages between the genders, more females in Tyler tend to live in poverty compared to males in all age groups.

Most of the females who live in poverty there are ages 18 to 24, followed by males of the same age range, and females ages 25-34.

Twenty percent of the population in Tyler (19,900 out of 98,600 people) live below the poverty line, which is higher than the national average (13.4 percent).

– Poverty by Race and Ethnicity

Like gender and age, race and ethnicity also show differences in the percentages affected by poverty.

Poverty by Race and Ethnicity - Tyler, Texas

The most common racial or ethnic group living below the poverty line in Tyler is white, followed by black and Hispanic.

– Employment by Occupations

From 2016 to 2017, employment in Tyler decreased at a rate of -0.152 percent from 46,100 to 46,000 employees.

These are the most common jobs in Tyler, grouped by the number of people employed:

  • Sales and Related Occupations (5,601 people)
  • Office and Administrative Support Occupations (5,454 people)
  • Management Occupations (3,755 people)

Driving in Tyler

City driving has its challenges, and in Tyler, it’s no different. Traffic congestion, road work, and parking dilemmas can make it hard to get where you need to go.

In this section, we’ll go through the best routes to take, and even some popular road trips along the way to help you prepare for driving in Tyler.

Let’s get the motor running, and learn more about Tyler highways.

– Roads in Tyler

Our first stop will cover Tyler’s roads. You might wonder how bad the traffic is and how many roads may have tolls. Are speeding and red light cameras watching your every move?

No need to worry. We’ve got all the information you need to answer your questions and set your mind at ease.

Keep rolling to learn more.

– Major Highways

Highways are the routes traffic takes to reach its destination.

Texas has 25 active interstates, which make up 3,501 miles of roadway. One of those highways, U.S. Highway 69, is the major north-south route from Lindale south through Tyler down to Bullard and Jacksonville.

Tyler Texas Major Highways

Among state highways, Texas Highway 31 is a major east-west corridor to Kilgore and Athens. Highways 64 and 110 are also major routes in and out of Tyler, providing a more northwest-southeast alignment.

Regarding toll highways, Toll Loop 49 is available for drivers heading westbound from Tyler to Dallas and elsewhere. Toll 49 currently runs from near Whitehouse westward, ending at U.S. 69 between Lindale and Mineola. U.S. Highway 271 provides the shortest access to I-20 while heading east to Longview and Shreveport.

Loop 323 functions as a ground-level 4-6 lane inner-loop, while the new Toll Loop 49 will provide a large outer-loop when it’s completed.

Alongside other new toll roads in Texas, Toll 49 uses state-of-the-art technology. Seven unmanned toll stations let drivers pay tolls electronically without having to stop.

Toll 49 recognizes the statewide TxTag in addition to the Dallas area TollTag and the Houston area EZ TAG. If a vehicle doesn’t have an electronic toll tag, a bill for the toll charges will be mailed to the owner through the “Pay by Mail” system.

How much you’ll pay to take Toll Loop 49 depends on your route, your type of vehicle, and the pass you use.

Cars with a trailer pay twice the base rate per mile. Tractor-trailer trucks pay four times the base rate if they are hauling one trailer and five times the rate when hauling two trailers.

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– Popular Road Trips/Sites

Now that you’ve read about Tyler’s highways and tolls, where are the best places to go? Tyler and the surrounding areas of Texas offer much to do for everyone, so check out this short list if you need some inspiration.

8 Country Roads In Texas With Beautiful Fall Foliage – a couple of Tyler’s roads made this list among others in and around East Texas.

10 Of The Best Small Town Restaurants In Texas – Texas has its share of classic American diner food, and you’ll find plenty of “down-home” meal options in Tyler and throughout the state.

The 14 Best Places In Texas For A Marriage Proposal – The Tyler Rose Gardens made this list of top spots to pop the question.

Some say that “everything old is new again,” so even if it’s been a while since you’ve seen some of these places before, you still look at them with a fresh perspective.

– Tyler Speeding and Red Light Cameras

The City of Tyler doesn’t currently have any speeding or red light camera laws. On June 2, 2019, Governor Abbott signed a bill banning the use of red light cameras.

– Vehicles in Tyler

Vehicles get people where they need to go. Despite the many alternate forms of transportation available, like other cities, Tyler has a high rate of vehicle ownership.

With the responsibility of vehicle ownership, problems can occur. Tickets from speeding and potential theft are among the unpleasant results you may face.

We’ve gathered some data to help you see what it’s like to own a car in Tyler and where the safest places to live and own one are.

Scroll on to learn more.

– Tyler Cars Per Household

Car Ownership in Tyler, Texas

As shown in the chart below, most households in Tyler own two cars, which matches the national average. After that, many households own one car, and then three cars.

– Households Without a Car

A small number of Tyler residents depend entirely on other forms of transportation to reach their destinations.

YearHouseholds Without VehiclesVehicles Per Household
20156.9%1.94
20167.0%1.86

From 2015 to 2016, the percentage of households without vehicles dropped slightly. If more people continue buying cars in Tyler, these numbers may continue to decline.

– Speed Traps in Tyler

Law enforcement officers set up speed traps to catch people who drive above the speed limit. Officers often park out of the view of the road, so it’s not always clear that they’re there when someone zips past them.

Fortunately, Tyler isn’t among the top 10 worst cities in Texas for speed traps.

Despite that, watch out for speed traps throughout the city and ensure you drive the speed limit to avoid a ticket.

– Vehicle Theft in Tyler

Finding that your vehicle is gone can be devastating. As the video below shows, it has even happened to Tyler’s finest:

The FBI reported that in 2013, 180 vehicles were stolen in the Tyler area. But, this number has decreased in recent years.

Neighborhood Scout found that in 2017, 148 vehicles were stolen, down slightly from the prior four years.

If you live in a safer area of Tyler, your chances of becoming a victim of vehicle theft may be lower. According to Neighborhood Scout, Browning is the safest neighborhood in the city.

Safest Neighborhoods in Tyler, Texas

Other safe parts of Tyler include:

  • Fm 2661 / Route 31
  • S Broadway Ave / Cumberland Rd
  • Fm 2813 / Neighbors Rd
  • Oxford Dr / Purdue Dr
  • Swan
  • Elberta
  • Golden Rd / Old Troup Hwy
  • Fm 2661 / Route 64
  • Shady Grove / Owentown

These neighborhoods are the safest places to live in Tyler because they have lower crime rates. But, even so, your chances of being the victim of a violent crime aren’t completely eliminated.

In Tyler, you have a one in 222 chance of being the victim of a violent crime.

This rate is slightly shy of the entire state’s statistic, where you have a one in 228 chance of being a victim.

Tyler Violent Crimes 2017MurderRapeRobberyAssault
Report Total66860338
Rate per 1,0000.060.650.573.22

The high number of violent crimes in Tyler could explain why Tyler’s crime index rating is only 11. This means that Tyler is safer than only 11 percent of all U.S. cities. Let’s look more closely at Tyler’s annual crimes in 2017.

Tyler, Texas Annual Crimes 2017ViolentPropertyTotal
Number of Crimes4723,4103,882
Crime Rate (Per 1,000 Residents)4.532.4836.97

Though it doesn’t have the worst crime rates, Tyler’s numbers are still fairly high, which suggests that if possible, make moving to a safe neighborhood there a priority to decrease your chances of becoming another crime statistic.

– Traffic

Traffic congestion can be a nightmare. Sitting in long car lines while you move slowly can become an aggravation that worsens over time.

What’s the traffic in Tyler like? What if you need some car repairs as a result of an accident?

Get ready to read the answers to these questions and more below as we explore the state of Tyler’s traffic.

– Traffic Congestion in Tyler

Good news! Tyler didn’t make it onto any major traffic scorecards (such as Inrix), however, cities like Austin, Dallas, Corpus Christi, and Houston are listed as the worst cities for traffic in Texas.

Though Tyler isn’t among the cities with the most congested traffic, you will still have to handle the headaches of regular city traffic — including the city’s old traffic control system — if you travel at peak commute times in the morning and in the evening.

– Transportation

In Tyler, most drivers face a shorter commute time (19.5 minutes) than the average American worker. Most Tyler residents spend 24.6 minutes commuting to work, or a total of 50 minutes a day. This is just slightly less than the U.S. average commute time of 25.1 minutes.

About two percent of Tyler residents have super commutes (longer than 90 minutes).

Fortunately, most drivers in Tyler have fairly short average commute times. The chart below shows more detail about the length of the average commute in Tyler.

Commute Time - Tyler, Texas

Now, let’s see how most Tyler residents get around in the chart below.

Commuter Transportation - Tyler, Texas

In 2017, most drivers drove alone, followed by those who carpooled and those who worked at home.

– How Safe are Tyler’s Streets and Roads?

Let’s see how safe Tyler’s roads and streets are through a close look at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) data on fatalities in Smith County.

First, these are the numbers for all fatal crashes.

Tyler (Smith County)20132014201520162017
Fatalities2943615746

Unfortunately, the number of fatalities increased from 2013 to 2017. Let’s look further at these numbers to examine the main causes of Tyler’s fatal crashes.

Crash Type20132014201520162017
Involving an Alcohol-Impaired Driver (BAC=.08+)1017241717
Single Vehicle1424232224
Involving Speeding111825916
Involving a Roadway Departure1225393024
Involving an Intersection (or Intersection Related)88574

In single-vehicle crashes and roadway departures, Smith County has seen an increase in fatalities over the years.

Person Type20132014201520162017
Passenger Car Occupant1413302118
Pedestrian565811
Pedalcyclist01111

The number of passenger car occupant and pedestrian/motor vehicle accidents also saw a slight rise from 2013 to 2017.

– Highways With the Most Fatal Crashes

Which highways in Tyler are the most dangerous? See below for 2017 NHTSA data on the most dangerous types of highways.

Tyler, Texas Road TypeFatal Crashes
Rural1
Urban0
Freeway and Expressway3
Other14
Minor Arterial9
Collector Arterial14
Local1
Unknown0
Total Fatal Crashes42

Among the most dangerous highways were collector arterials. These roads bring local traffic to arterial roads (or highways).

Statewide, in 2017, Texas had a total of 3,343 fatal crashes on its highways, which was much higher than the number of casualties in Smith County.

– Railroad and Highway Crash Incidents

Here is the U.S. DOT’s information on railroad and highway crash incidents in Tyler.

HighwayHighway User TypeRail Equipment TypeNon-Suicide FatalityNon-Suicide Injury
SHAW STREETAutomobileFreight Train00
LINE STREETAutomobileYard/Switch00
N PALACE AVENUEAutomobileFreight Train00
LOOP 323 AND HWY 271Pick-up truckFreight Train00
SHAW ST.AutomobileFreight Train01

If you drive on one of the highways listed above, remember that crashes have occurred on them and be careful.

– Allstate America’s Best Drivers Report

Allstate collected driving data to create a report on drivers in major U.S. cities. Several Texas cities, including Brownsville, Laredo, McAllen, Amarillo, and Corpus Christi, made the list, but the Tyler metro area wasn’t among them.

The report measures the average years between claims, the likelihood of filing claims, and the number of hard-braking incidents to reveal how people drive in a certain area.

Besides making a conscious effort to drive safely, you can take defensive driving courses to brush up on your skills. The City of Tyler offers a defensive driving course which can help drivers remove citations from their records.

– Ridesharing

Outside of traditional taxi services, ridesharing services Lyft and Uber operate in Tyler. It costs slightly less to use Uber compared to Lyft for most types of rides.

Comparing rates for your destination on sites like RideGuru can help you keep your costs down.

– EStar Repair Shops

Esurance rates repair shops through their EStar network so that people can find the best shop in their area for car repairs. Below is an EStar repair shop in Tyler.

ShopAddressContact Info
PATTERSON COLLISION CENTER
3120 S SOUTHWEST LOOP 323
TYLER TX 75701
Email: rudkins@autonation.com
P: (903) 579-2269

If your car needs work, consider EStar shops for top-quality repairs and service.

– Weather

Let’s take a look at U.S. Climate’s data on Tyler’s average weather.

Tyler weather averages
Annual high temperature76.8°F
Annual low temperature54.3°F
Average temperature65.55°F
Average annual precipitation – rainfall46.66 inches
Average annual snowfall1 inch

The average temperatures throughout the year in Tyler are pretty moderate — neither too high nor too low. But, they’re not low enough not to receive any snow, which the city gets at an average of an inch per year. And, at 46 inches of rainfall annually, Tyler gets less rain than other parts of Texas.

Regarding natural disasters, Tyler averages 25 a year, which is much higher than the U.S annual average of 13. On top of that, nine local and 15 national emergencies have been declared.

Smith County has experienced the following (in order of most to least): storms, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, winds, and winter storms.

Storms occur an average of ten times a year in Tyler, and those involving snow, about once every year.

To protect yourself and your car from weather damage, you should have comprehensive insurance coverage on your vehicle.

It will cover the costs of damages or replacement for your vehicle in case of natural disasters, theft, or vandalism — essentially, any damage that doesn’t involve a vehicle collision. And, with enough coverage, you won’t have to pay out of pocket, but your insurance will.

– Public Transit

If you don’t own a car or don’t always want to use it, you can take a bus in Tyler. The main public transportation system is Tyler Transit. Basic fares for each bus trip are listed below:

  • Adult 12 and older — $1.00
  • Children ages 6 to 11 — $0.50
  • Children age 5 and under —  Free
  • Medicare, Seniors (65 and older) and people with disabilities — $0.50

For the safety of everyone aboard, operators do not carry change; therefore, cash fares require exact change.

These are the prices for passes:

  • Regular 30 Day Pass                $40.00
  • Half Fare* 30 Day Pass            $20.00
  • Student 30 Day Pass                $20.00
  • Student Semester Pass            $50.00
  • Regular 7 Day Pass                  $10.00
  • Half Fare* 7 Day Pass              $5.00
  • Student 7 Day Pass                  $5.00
  • All Day Pass                              $2.00

*Half Fare prices are for Medicare recipients, seniors (65 and older), and for people with disabilities. To take advantage of the Half Fare price, you must bring documentation to the Tyler Transit office and buy a Tyler Transit Half Fare ID card ($2.00) to show to the driver every time you board the bus.

– Alternate Transportation

If you would rather get around the city on a bike or a scooter than on a bus, Tyler has plenty of options.  Bike and scooter rental company Lime and scooter renter Bird don’t currently operate in the city, but these are other options:

Cyclology Bike Rental Co. provides men’s and women’s mountain and hybrid bikes for $35.00 per day; multi-day discounts are also available.

EagleRider rents motor scooters, dirt bikes, and motorcycles of all kinds together with additional protective gear.

– Parking in Metro Areas

Where are the best places to park in Tyler? Let’s explore your parking options there.

Downtown Tyler offers metered parking spaces at a two-hour maximum from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Disabled people and veterans who properly display special license plates or placards may park in any metered space free of charge. The nearby Plaza Tower Lot charges $2.00 for one-hour parking in one of its spaces.

If you happen to get a parking ticket, you can pay it online at the city’s website.

Downtown Tyler also features the Fair Plaza Parking Garage with 384 spaces, which is a FREE alternative for those who want to park all-day. Reserved spaces are also available for purchase.

If you drive an electric vehicle, Tyler has a total of nine charging stations for Level 2 and Level 3 charging ports within a 15 km radius of the city. Of these charging stations, four are completely free.

– Air Quality in Tyler

Living in the city has its drawbacks — one of the biggest ones is poor air quality from pollution. Read on for some interesting data about the levels of air pollution from the EPA’s air quality study.

Tyler Air Quality (Smith County)201620172018
Days with AQI366364364
Good Days344336324
Moderate Days212838
Days Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups1-2
Days Unhealthy---
Days Very Unhealthy---

The number of days with moderate air quality increased from 2016 to 2018.  The good news is that in those three years, Tyler experienced no unhealthy or very unhealthy days.

But a few days were unhealthy for sensitive groups. For those who are sensitive to air quality changes, those can be difficult times, so make sure you pay attention to any local air quality warnings.

Military/Veterans

The military protects and serves our nation. To honor their service and commitment, let’s explore the insurance options for military personnel and veterans in Tyler.

Car insurance can be expensive, however, some insurers may offer military discounts.

So, read on to find out more about life for military personnel in Tyler and car insurance discounts available to them there.

– Veterans by Service Period

Nearly matching the national average, Tyler has more Vietnam veterans than those from other conflicts — 1,952, to be exact.

Veterans in Tyler, Texas

Recent Gulf War veterans and those from the Korean conflict round out the top three.

– Military Bases Within an Hour

No military bases are currently within an hour away from Tyler in East Texas.

– Military Discounts by Providers

Below is a list of insurance providers who provide military discounts, together with the percentages of savings they offer.

InsurerPercentage Saved with Discount
AllstateN/A
FarmersN/A
Geico (may be active or retired)15%
Liberty Mutual (must be active duty)4%
MetLife15% (could vary based on years of service)
Safeco (may be active or retired)N/A
USAA (policyholder, spouse, or parents must be active or retired military to secure policy)N/A

USAA also offers a discount for parking in garages. If you don’t see an insurer on the list above, make sure to ask about discounts anyway; local providers — outside of major national ones — may also offer military discounts.

– USAA in Tyler

USAA provides car insurance only to military personnel and veterans, with reduced premiums compared to other insurers.  Here’s how their rates stack up against competitors in Texas

GroupAnnual PremiumCompared to State Average (+/-)Compared to State Average (%)
Allstate$5,485.44$1,442.1626.29%
Progressive$4,664.69$621.4113.32%
Nationwide$3,867.55-$175.73-4.54%
Geico$3,263.28-$780.00-23.90%
State Farm$2,879.94-$1,163.34-40.39%
USAA$2,487.89-$1,555.39-62.52%

USAA offers the lowest rates, which are almost half of the state average.

Unique Tyler City Laws

Driving laws aren’t just statewide — they can change from city to city. It can be tough to pay attention to all of the details. It may be legal to use a handheld device in one city, while another one can ban them entirely.

We want to help you avoid paying any fines, so in this section, we’ll cover Tyler’s unique city laws.

Keep reading to find out about the major laws you must follow in Tyler.

– Hands-Free Law

Texas has banned texting while driving. This means that whenever you send a text there while you’re behind the wheel, you are breaking the law.

Drivers may still use hands-free devices, such as Bluetooth, while driving, but as of 2019, the legislature is considering banning hand-held devices.

Currently, drivers with learner’s permits are prohibited from using handheld cell phones in the first six months of driving, as are drivers under age 18.  The ban also applies to drivers in school crossing zones and on public school property during the time the reduced speed limit applies.

These laws are primary enforcement, meaning than an officer can pull you over for these offenses.

Tyler doesn’t currently have any specific cell phone laws.

– Food Trucks

As part of a three-year pilot program, Tyler allows “mobile food units” and food truck parks. The law states that the program is intended to support “small-business start-ups, diverse cuisine options, and tourism-inducing environments.”

Like other cities, Tyler has certain regulations and requirements food truck vendors must follow.  These are the  permits and inspections the city requires:

  1. All required permits must be displayed in a location that is easily viewable by the public.
  2. All Mobile Food Units shall obtain all applicable permits and inspections from the City of Tyler (including Fire Department) and the Northeast Texas Public Health District, or successor. All Mobile Food Units operating within Smith County must be authorized to do so.
  3. All Mobile Food Units on private property and City-owned property shall require a Transient Vendor Permit issued by the Planning Director, unless exempt as follows:
  • Mobile Food Units operating under an approved Parks and Recreation Department Special event permit.
  • Mobile Food Units operating under an approved Temporary Use Permit issued for a special event.
  • Mobile Food Units operating under an approved permit issued by the Water Quality and Production Manager for Lake event permits.
  • Mobile Food Units operating at an approved Food Truck Park.

Food trucks that sell only frozen desserts may operate on any city street provided that they do not impair the safety of the public and operate in a safe manner.

Vendors on city streets can’t park for more than six hours and not between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. They must also meet other operational and location-based requirements, which include more parking regulations.

– Tiny Homes

Tiny homes appeal to people who want to simplify their lives. Before you abandon standard housing, you should be aware that tiny homes have specific regulations.

A tiny home is usually considered a mobile home and must follow the same laws.

If you choose not to park in a mobile home park, you will need to file the proper permits and follow Tyler’s zoning ordinances.

If you are on a plot of land, you will need access to a septic tank, water, and other utilities before you can be approved to live on the land legally.

Don’t let all these laws discourage you from owning a tiny home. Once you become familiar with the city’s requirements, you’ll be ready to own a tiny house.

– Parking Laws

Like other cities, Tyler has enacted certain parking laws meant to help everyone play by the rules and keep its citizens safe.

Regarding reserved parking spaces, it’s an offense “to place, maintain, or display upon or in view of the public sidewalk, curb or street, a sign, signal, marking or device which indicates a reserved parking space.”

This for “adjoining owners or for customers of the adjoining owners upon the street or in areas recessed from the street which require use of the street for maneuvering, if without lawful authority.”

Drivers also can’t try to reserve a parking space on a street “for an adjoining owner by verbal statement or gesture, if without lawful authority.”

Tyler Car Insurance FAQs

You might have some lingering questions about living in Tyler. If your inquiring mind still wants to know more, we’ll answer more questions below.

We’re here to help clear up any confusion you have, whether you’re moving to the city or simply need to know more about it.

So, read on below for answers to the major questions people ask about life in Tyler and the car insurance available there.

– Is Tyler, TX, a good place to live?

Niche, a site that ranks cities, schools, and neighborhoods based on federal government data, school reviews, and other research, has given Tyler an overall grade of A-minus. It ranks 49th (of 228) on their list of the Best Cities to Retire in America.

It also made their lists of the Most Diverse Cities in America (#41 of 228) and Cities With the Lowest Cost of Living in America (#48 of 228). With these factors, and the quality of its schools, which it considers “above average,” they believe Tyler’s “suburban feel” makes it good for families.

– Which city is Tyler close to?

Tyler is located in the geographical area of East Texas known as the “Piney Woods,” about half-way between Dallas and Shreveport, and just south of the Interstate I-20 corridor. U.S. Highway 69 is the major north-south route through the city.

– What is Tyler, Texas known for?

In 1846, the Texas Legislature formed Smith County and named a five-person commission to establish a county government.

The group picked a site near the geographic center of the county and named it for U. S. President John Tyler, who was a strong proponent for Texas’ annexation…Tyler is also the world’s largest grower of commercially produced rose bushes, and is known as the “Rose Capital of America.”

– Is Tyler, TX, safe?

We touched upon the crime rate above in our section about vehicle theft. Suffice to say, Tyler ranks fairly high in crime with a rate of 44 per one thousand residents, according to data from Neighborhood Scout. As it turns out, 91 percent of communities in the state of Texas have a crime rate lower than Tyler.

– What are the car insurance requirements in Texas?

Texas requires drivers to carry these minimum auto insurance coverages: Bodily Injury Liability: $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident. Property Damage Liability: $25,000. Personal Injury Protection (PIP): $2,500 (unless you reject this coverage).

– How much is car insurance in Texas per month?

The average cost of a full coverage premium (liability, collision, and comprehensive coverage) in the Lone Star State is $92.47 per month or $1,109.66 yearly.

– Is car insurance expensive in Texas?

It depends on your income and your car insurance needs. Generally speaking, the average Texan earns $3,424 per month, and out of that, spends roughly 2.59 percent of disposable income (after taxes) on car insurance.

What did you think? Did we answer all of your most burning questions?

Now that you’ve finished our guide on car insurance in Tyler and living there, you’ve learned all there is to know about the state of the city and your options for car insurance rates.

Enter your zip code below to start comparison shopping today.

References:

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